Peer Reviewed

1

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-7-2015

Keywords

Adalimumab, Chron's Disease, Osteoporosis, Bone Metabolism.

Comments

The original article is available at www.springer.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Infliximab has been shown to have beneficial effects on bone metabolism in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) although as yet the exact mechanisms have not been fully elucidated.

AIM: To evaluate the impact of adalimumab therapy on bone metabolism using a combined in vivo and in vitro model.

METHODS: Parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, bone formation markers, bone resorption marker, pro-inflammatory cytokines, anti-inflammatory cytokines, osteoprotegerin, and sRANKL were measured in control patients and pre- and post-treatment with adalimumab in CD patients. The effect of control patients' and pre- and post-treatment CD patients' sera on human osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19) in vitro cell viability and differentiation was also analyzed.

RESULTS: There was a significant increase in bone formation markers osteocalcin (P < 0.05) and procollagen type 1 N-terminal propeptide (P < 0.01) at 1 and 3 months post-treatment. Moreover, there was a sustained but not significant fall in serum CTx, a bone resorption marker. No significant change was seen over time with other parameters measured. Serum from CD patients pre-treated with adalimumab showed increased osteoblast viability compared with that of post-treated patients at 6 months (P = 0.002) and controls. However, post-adalimumab treatment sera at 6 months appeared to increase osteoblast differentiation (P = 0.001), which is likely to be important in new bone formation.

CONCLUSIONS: This first study evaluating the role of adalimumab as a possible bone protector in Crohn's disease patients has shown that similar to infliximab, adalimumab has complex and potentially beneficial effects on bone metabolism.

Disciplines

Anatomy

Citation

Veerappan SG, Healy M, Walsh BJ, O'Morain CA, Daly JS, Ryan BM. Adalimumab Therapy Has a Beneficial Effect on Bone Metabolism in Patients with Crohn's Disease. Digestive Diseases and Sciences. 2015 Jul;60(7):2119-29.

PubMed ID

25732718

DOI Link

10.1007/s10620-015-3606-z

Creative Commons License


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

Included in

Anatomy Commons

Share

COinS